Tuesday, November 1, 2011

Olympia, The Seductress


Olympia, The Seductress
9 x 12 inches 
Oil on wood panel.
SOLD

Édouard Manet is considered by many to be the father of Impressionism.  In 1863, he painted, Olympia, a nude that was seen by many as scandalous.  What shocked people was not the nudity itself, there had been many other nudes before Manet's, but it was the fact that she seemed so comfortable in her nudity and the intense look directly at the viewer.  That is what I am trying to do with this painting.  Show a lovely woman in a pose that clearly says she is at ease with herself, and willing to look the viewer in the eye.  This work was inspired by a photo of model, Luba Korovina, taken by Russian photographer, Oleg Kosyrev, (http://www.photosight.ru/users/2063/) who graciously allowed me to use it for reference. 



If you click on the photos to enlarge them, also click on the link, 
Show Originals to see the largest size.
_______

Olympia, by Ă‰douard Manet





Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Michigan Farm



Michigan Farm
9 x 12 inches
Oil on wood panel.

Recently, when I was back in Coldwater, Michigan for a visit, my sister, Robin Walling, and I drove around to find scenes that I might want to paint. It was cloudy at the time, but this barn appealed to me. It is at the corner of Bell Road and Hayner Road, north of Girard.

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Friday, August 12, 2011

Mallard



Mallard
6 x 6 inches
Oil on wood panel

Over the years, I have taken many photos of ducks and geese. I finally decided it was time to paint one.

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Friday, July 22, 2011

Face to Face
6 x 6 inches
Oil on wood panel

This is based on a photo I took in the Getty Museum in Los Angeles. I liked the way it looked as if they were gazing into each other's eyes.

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Monday, July 18, 2011

Monument Valley


Monument Valley
18 x 24inches
Oil on canvas
(c) Bill Brauker

Monument Valley is a remarkable place. When you visit, it will stay with you forever. The vastness of it is incredible and that sky, well, it takes your breath away. One of the interesting things we noticed is that the white clouds had a red cast to them on the bottom, from the reflection from the ground. When I got home, I just couldn't get the vision of this place out of my mind. This was a joy to paint.

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I also have paintings available on www.dailypaintworks.com. To see them, click on this link,http://www.dailypaintworks.com/artists/bbrauker-1324

Thursday, June 30, 2011

Decorah Eagle


Decorah Eagle
8 x 10 inches
Oil on wood panel.

This is my tribute to the Decorah eagles.

For the past months, I have been watching daily as the eaglets have grown from the little balls of feathers that emerged from their eggs in early April, to the large flying eagles they are today. As they learn how to hunt and perfect their flying skills, they are still hanging around the nest in Decorah, IA. To see the web cam, click here:
http://www.ustream.tv/decoraheagles

There is nothing more magnificent than seeing an eagle in flight. As John Denver put it, "I know he'd be a poorer man if he never saw an Eagle fly, Rocky mountain high..."

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Monday, June 27, 2011

Morning Wave, Huntington Beach, California


Morning Wave,
Huntington Beach, California
6 x 12 inches
Oil on wood panel


Early morning on the beach is a magical time. I love painting the waves.

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I also have paintings available on www.dailypaintworks.com. To see them, click on this link, http://www.dailypaintworks.com/artists/bbrauker-1324


Detail of the painting.

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Montana Sky


Montana Sky
6 x 6 inches
Oil on wood panel

This is based on a photo I took in Montana, on the way to the Little Bighorn Battlefield. It was a beautiful, sunny September day.

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Monday, June 13, 2011

Shadows on the Rio Grande Gorge, Taos

Shadows on the Rio Grande Gorge, Taos
11x 14inches
Oil on canvas

This is a view of the Rio Grande Gorge, as seen from the high road from Santa Fe to Taos.

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Detail of the painting.

Monday, June 6, 2011

Red Dress



Red Dress
11 x 14 inches
Oil on canvas.
SOLD

Lovely lady preparing for a night out in her red dress.

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Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Lotus Blossom Buds



Lotus Blossom Buds
6 x 6 inches
oil on wood panel

I just loved the variety of color on these buds. The painting was inspired by a photograph taken by Guy Pushee, a fantastic photographer from, Wilmington, NC, who graciously allowed me to use his terrific shot. Check out his wonderful work here, http://www.guypushee.com.

Click here to go to eBay and bid on this or other paintings I have listed.
Detail of the painting.




Sunday, May 22, 2011

Pretty Kitty

Pretty Kitty
6 x 6 inches
oil on wood panel

This painting was done for "The Whole Cat and Kaboodle Challenge" at http://www.dailypaintworks.com

Click here to go to eBay and bid on this or other paintings I have listed.





Monday, May 16, 2011

California House





California House
6 x 6 inches
oil on wood panel

This is based on a photo I took from the car on Pacific Coast Highway, I think in Huntington Beach, CA. (Might have been Laguna.) It was a beautiful bright day, and I loved the flowers by the wall.

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Detail of the painting.

Saturday, May 14, 2011

Canyon de Chelly

Canyon de Chelly
6 x 6 inches
Oil on wood panel.
(c) Bill Brauker

Canyon de Chelly National Monument is located in northeastern Arizona within the boundaries of the Navajo Nation. It preserves ruins of the early tribes that lived in the area. The canyon also sustains a living community of Navajo people, who are connected to a landscape of great historical and spiritual significance. Access to the canyon floor is restricted, and visitors are allowed to travel in the canyons only when accompanied by a park ranger or an authorized Navajo guide.

It is possible to see wonderful views of the canyon from both the north and south rims. This view of the canyon is based on a photo I took at the Antelope House overlook.

Click here to go to eBay and bid on this or other paintings I have listed.

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Friday, May 6, 2011

Valley of the Gods


Valley of the Gods
6 x 6 inches
Oil on wood panel.
(c) Bill Brauker


One of the most remarkable places on earth is the Valley of the Gods, a scenic sandstone valley near Mexican Hat, Utah. A 17 mile dirt road meanders among the towering rock formations in this beautiful valley. We got up just before dawn and were there at first light.

Click here to go to eBay and bid on this or other paintings I have listed.

http://braukerart.blogspot.com
http://brauker.com

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Trees at Point Vincente


Trees at Point Vincente
6 x 6 inches
Oil on wood panel.
(c) Bill Brauker

Last week when we were in California, we visited Point Vincente in Palos Verdes. It is a beautiful place where there is a path along the top of the cliff that overlooks the ocean below. These trees were not far from the edge. I loved the way they were bent away from the ocean by the winds.

A closer look.
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Friday, April 22, 2011

Inseparable


Inseparable
6 x 6 inches
Oil on wood panel.

I just loved the way these two cherries made the perfect couple.

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http://braukerart.blogspot.com
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Thursday, April 21, 2011


Lemon and Watermelon Slices
6 x 6 inches
Oil on wood panel.
(c) Bill Brauker

I thought I would experiment some with a still life, since I haven't done many.

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A closer look.

Sunday, April 17, 2011

6" Squared Show

Here I am last night at the Randy Higbee Gallery in Costa Mesa,California for the 6" Squared Show. There was a huge crowd, and the paintings were great. My painting, Taos Pueblo is the one on the top in the center.

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Gettysburg Morning

Gettysburg Morning
6 x 6 inches
Oil on wood panel.
(c) Bill Brauker

Yesterday, April 12, was the 150th anniversary of the start of the most horrific conflict ever fought on American soil. Known as the Civil War, or the War Between the States, at the end of the four year war, 620,000 brave young men lay dead from combat and disease. I painted this yesterday as a reminder and tribute to the brave soldiers of both sides, Americans all.

This is an early morning view of a battle cannon pointed out towards the mist shrouded fields of Gettysburg. The painting was inspired by a photograph by Jack Jay Jenkins, a wonderful photographer who chronicles Civil War Reenactments. You can see his photography here.

Contact me if you are interested in purchasing this painting for $100 (free shipping). Credit cards welcomed.

http://braukerart.blogspot.com
http://brauker.com


Tuesday, April 5, 2011

Country Road


Country Road
6 x 6 inches
Oil on wood panel.
(c) Bill Brauker

Ah, a peaceful country road in the summer. Makes me want to go for a drive.

Contact me if you are interested in purchasing this painting for $100 (free shipping). Credit cards welcomed.

Thursday, March 31, 2011

6" Squared Exhibition and Sale

I'm pleased to announce that my painting Taos Pueblo, was selected by the jury for the, 6" Squared exhibition and sale at the Randy Higbee Gallery in Costa Mesa, California.



Please contact the Randy Higbee Gallery for sales information.

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Clouds Over The Front Range

Clouds Over The Front Range
5 x 7 inches
Oil on wood panel
(c) Bill Brauker

I went for a walk yesterday afternoon near my house in Westminster, CO and spotted these clouds over the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. It is one of my favorite views from the neighborhood.

This is my entry in the Daily Paintworks challenge to raise funds for the people of Japan. Artists from around the world are donating the proceeds from the sales of all the paintings on the challenge site. To help this important cause, go to http://www.dailypaintworks.com/Challenge/FC50B15D-5016-4E5E-87F2-87C3F79BA65B to place a bid on my painting or on one of the hundreds of others available.


Sunday, March 13, 2011

Snow Tipi

Snow Tipi
6 x 6 inches
Oil on wood panel.

This was an experiment on my part. An imagined painting. I love mountains, especially with lots of snow. It is amazing the different colors that nature makes so I wanted to play with that. I also love tipis. They are an incredible invention, a portable home that you can take anywhere. They are a great geometric shape and represent a history that is long and fascinating. Finally, I have always loved the many haystacks in winter paintings of Claude Monet. In a way this is my homage to the great master.

Thursday, March 10, 2011

California Sunset


California Sunset
6 x 6 inches
Oil on wood panel.

There is not much that compares with the beauty of sun setting into the Pacific off the California Coastline.

Monday, March 7, 2011

Taos Pueblo



Taos Pueblo
6 x 6 inches
Oil on wood panel.

Taos Pueblo is one of those places you visit, where you know you are seeing something special. It gives you a glimpse back into history.

The Pueblo, is one of the oldest continuously inhabited communities, and is the largest surviving multistoried Pueblo structure in the United States. Built between 1000 and 1450 A.D. it appears today much like it would have been a millennium ago.

In 1960, Taos Pueblo was designated a National Historic Landmark, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1966. In 1992, the Pueblo was named by the United Nations to the “World Heritage List,” due to its uniqueness and universal value to the heritage of all mankind.

Approximately 150 people live within the Pueblo full time.

This was a joy to paint, I love the adobe buildings, the brilliant sunshine, and shadows, and oh, the blue of the sky and the mountains.
The painting was exhibited in the juried, 6x6 Inch Squared show in Costa Mesa, California in April 2011.




Thursday, February 24, 2011

Waves, Huntington Beach, Early Morn




Waves, Huntington Beach, Early Morn
6 x 6 inches
Oil on wood panel.


This is based on a photo I took shortly after sunrise at Huntington Beach in early December 2010. It was a magic time.

I currently have paintings for sale on eBay. You can find them here.

Friday, January 21, 2011

The Wait

The Wait
Oil on canvas.
11 x 14 inches

This painting was inspired by a lovely photograph taken by Emilya Manole, a photographer from Romania who graciously allowed me to use it. To see more of her great photos, click here.


Monday, January 3, 2011

Crazy Horse

Crazy Horse
11 x 14 inches
Oil on canvas
(c) Bill Brauker

About the Painting:

Why does this painting not look much like an Indian? The answer is simple, because Crazy Horse did not look much like an Indian.

Crazy Horse was most often described as small and slender, 5'6 to 5'8" very light complected, with long, fine, light brown hair and hazel eyes. When he was a child he was known by two names, given to him by his mother, Curley and Light Hair, because of his unusual hair.

In an interview at Pine Ridge, South Dakota, July 8, 1930, (Mrs. Annie Rowland, interpreter) Red Feather, Crazy Horse's brother in law said, "Crazy Horse was a nice-looking man, with brown, not black, hair, a sharp nose, and a narrow face. Nobody on the reservation nowadays looks like him. His nose was straight and thin. His hair was very long, straight, and fine in texture. "

In 1867, Crazy Horse was shot in the face with a small pistol wielded by a jealous husband. The bullet entered his face close to the left nostril and exited out his neck just under the back of his skull. The recovery was slow but complete, and a scar remained the rest of his life.

Short Bull, (aka Short Buffalo) a Sioux warrior who fought with Crazy Horse at the Little Bighorn, said, “Crazy Horse was a man not very tall and not very short, neither broad nor thin. His hair was very light about the color of yours. (The interviewer could be described as a medium blonde).

But Crazy Horse had a very light complexion, much lighter than the other Indians. He usually wore a Iroquois shell necklace; this was the only ornament he wore. His features were not like those of the rest of us. His face was not broad, and he had a sharp, high nose. He had black eyes that hardly ever looked straight at a man, but they didn't miss much that was going on, all the same. " (The Nebraska Indian Wars Reader edited by R. Eli Paul, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, NE 1998, p 202 - 208 )

Frank Grouard was a scout and interpreter for the cavalry. In his younger years, he had lived in the camps of Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse for seven to eight years. He said, "Crazy Horse had somewhat peculiar features. He had sandy hair and was of a very light complexion. He didn't have the high cheekbones that the Indians generally have and didn't talk much. He was a young looking Indian -- appeared much younger than his age. There were a few powder marks on one side of his face.

Little Killer, a long time friend of Crazy Horse, was interviewed by Eleanor Hinman on July 12, 1930. (Translated by Samuel Stands.) When asked to describe him, Little Killer said, "Crazy Horse was a short, little man. He did not have black hair; he had brown hair like a white man's and a long straight nose. His eyes were black like a Lakota's."

Susan Bordeaux Bettelyoun was born in 1857 to a fur trader and, a Brule Lakota woman. She lived at Fort Robinson where Crazy Horse surrendered to authorities in 1877. In later life, she described an encounter with him. "My husband, Chas. Tackett, was a scout, but when he was not on duty, he clerked in Jewett's store, and [he] had waited on Crazy Horse. My mother-in-law and I drove up to the store one day when Crazy Horse was there; she pointed him out to me. He was a very handsome young man of about thirty-six years or so. He was not so dark; he had hazel eyes, [and] nice, long light-brown hair.

What did Crazy Horse really look like? We may never know. Although there are some photographs that have been touted as being the Sioux warrior, none have been authenticated.

About Custer and Crazy Horse:

I have had an interest in history all my life, and last fall, made a road trip up into Wyoming, Montana, and South Dakota, visiting the Little Bighorn Battlefield, Deadwood, and Ft. Laramine. Since my return, I have been devouring books about the battle of the Little Bighorn, and all the fascinating characters who came together at that time. It was a true clash of cultures and I find myself understanding and sympathizing with both sides. These were men who were doing what they thought was right.

The two main players, George Armstrong Custer and Crazy Horse have much in common They were almost the same age, they were courageous fighters, and both were charismatic leaders.

Custer was a true hero of the Civil War. He won a major battle at Gettysburg that turned the tide for the Union Army. He also played a major role at the end of the war when he led the troops that trapped Robert E. Lee at the Appomattox Court House. Lee met General Ulysses Grant at Appomattox and surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia on April 9.

General Phillip Sheridan was so impressed by Custer's service, that he bought the table on which Grant had written the terms of surrender. He presented the table to Custer's wife Libbie and wrote her that, "I respectfully present to you the small writing table on which the conditions for surrender of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia was written by Lt. General Grant — and permit me to say Madam, that there was scarcely an individual in our service who has contributed more to bring about this desirable result than your very gallant husband." (The table is now in the Smithsonian Institution.

Through the late 1850s and early 1860s, Crazy Horse's reputation as a warrior grew, He was at every major battle of the Plains wars, and was always a leader. He was a major force at the Battle of the Little Bighorn that destroyed Custer and his entire force. There was no other Sioux warrior as famous in battle as the quiet, slender, Crazy Horse, who led not through words, but by actions.

After Crazy Horse turned himself in to authorities and vowed never to fight again, the attention paid to him by the Army caused friction with other chiefs. Soon rumors were spread that Crazy Horse was going to kill a general and go back on the war path. There was much trouble brewing. On September 5, 1877, he was led from his encampment to Fort Robinson, for what he thought was a meeting with army authorities. When he entered the fort, he was led toward a building by an army guard on one arm and by his life long friend, Little Big Man, holding his other arm. (Yes, there really was a Little Big Man. Unfortunately in the end, he betrayed his friend Crazy Horse.) As they neared it, Crazy Horse realized it was the guardhouse and that he was to be imprisoned. He began to struggle to break free and a guard stabbed him in the back with a bayonet.

A few hours later, Crazy horse was dead, a little over a year after his greatest triumph at the battle of the Little Bighorn.